Occasion of Munificent Harvest: Chuseok!

Khushi Vaid, New Delhi: In South Korea, the advent of the full moon on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month – around the Autumn Equinox, which occurs at the end of summer or early autumn – marks a major national holiday known as Chuseok, occasionally known as Hangawi, it is usually a three-day holiday. Chuseok, one of Korea’s three major holidays; the others being Seollal (January 1) and Dano (a day of spiritual rites), is traditionally observed to thank the nature for a bountiful harvest and to wish for another generous harvest in the coming year. There are many folklores or chronicles regarding the origin of Chuseok and few of the concrete stories I’ll be sharing here to understand how this tradition got started. 

History of Silla Dynasty

Mughda Sanjay Attarde, Mumbai, Maharashtra: Korea is a land with a significant history. Bak Hyeokgeose of Silla found Silla dynasty in 57 BC. When he turned 13, six clans submitted to him as king and established Saro-guk. Saro-guk comprised six villages and six clans. Silla was also referred as Gyerim and the dynasty was recorded to use Hanja or traditional writing system using Chinese characters. This dynasty acquired a detail system of law and governance, social status and official advancement by 6th century and the bone rank system dictated them.